Gert W. Munthe, Chairman, and Øystein Rekdal, CEO in Lytix Biopharma. Photo: Lytix Biopharma/ Håvar Haug

Lytix Biopharma and UiT with exclusive agreement

Lytix

Lytix Biopharma enters into an exclusive license agreement with the Arctic University of Norway (UiT) about drug candidates that combat cancer cells by stimulating the body’s own immune cells.

The Norwegian biotech company and Oslo Cancer Cluster member Lytix Biopharma has developed a new group of promising drug candidates together with a research team at the Arctic University of Norway (UiT). The drug candidates can combat cancer cells by stimulating the body’s own immune cells.

“Over the past year, we have achieved several key milestones with our most advanced drug candidate, LTX-315, and have successfully confirmed the unique potential of our technology platform. Through one of the joint projects with the scientific expertise at UiT, a set of new promising molecules have been discovered. This exclusive license agreement expands our overall product portfolio, which further demonstrates the robustness of our approach to this segment,” says CEO Øystein Rekdal at Lytix Biopharma in a press release from the company.

A broad collaboration

The drug candidates licensed have been developed in a collaboration between UiT and Lytix Biopharma, partly funded by the Norwegian Research Council and the Norwegian Cancer Society. A combined team from UiT, Norce, Oslo University Hospital and Institute Gustave Roussy in Paris have contributed to the project. Lytix Biopharma originally stems from the Arctic University in Tromsø.

This agreement grants Lytix Biopharma all rights to further develop and commercialize this new class of compounds.

Partnership with Aurelius Biotherapeutics

Lytix also forms a strategic partnership with the US-based specialist veterinary medicine company Aurelius Biotherapeutics to expedite the progression of the compounds that seem especially promising and suitable for the veterinary medicine market.

Aurelius Biotherapeutics now initiates further studies on this compound, to validate the initial data, and to refine its target product profile. Aurelius is currently also developing their own lead candidate, which now will be combined with the Lytix drug candidate.

Read more about the new partnerships in the press release from Lytix Biopharma. You can download it here.

Kerstin Jakobsson, CEO, Kongsberg Beam Technology.

Experienced CEO joins Kongsberg Beam Technology

Kerstin Jakobsson, CEO of Kongsberg Beam Technology

Kerstin Jakobsson has been appointed CEO to our member the Norwegian medtech company Kongsberg Beam Technology.

Kongsberg Beam Technology develops an advanced steering system able to deliver personalised proton therapy with better precision and less damage to healthy tissue. Proton therapy is an accepted and established cancer treatment and compared to traditional radiation therapy it focuses the energy on the tumour itself with less radiation to surrounding healthy tissue.

Kerstin Jakobsson has over thirty years of experience in the commercialisation of new technologies in the life science sector, with responsibility for international strategic and operational leadership. Jakobsson has been part of the management team of Medicon Village since the start and CEO for the last three years and has developed it into one of Scandinavia’s leading life science innovation parks.

Oslo Cancer Cluster Incubator has worked closely with Kongsberg Beam Technology for several years to develop the company through its SIVA-sponsored programme. Bjørn Klem, general manager, and Thomas Andersson, senior advisor business development, have taken a hands-on approach, which is what attracted Jakobsson to the position as CEO.

“I am familiar with Oslo Cancer Cluster because the organisation covers areas of interest with Medicon Village. I have known Bjørn for many years through the NOME network and Thomas introduced Kongsberg Beam Technology to me,” Jakobsson explained.

Jakobsson has worked with many different start-ups and public listed companies throughout the years. For instance, Jakobsson was CEO for the two successful medtech companies Spectracure and Ortoma – both are now listed on the Swedish stock exchange.

“I am an entrepreneur at heart, and I feel at home in start-ups.”

“I am an entrepreneur at heart, and I feel at home in start-ups. I prefer a good mix of strategy and implementation, which is possible in smaller organisations. To build and develop a company is very rewarding. I am also familiar with the challenges in taking on this role. I benefit from my contacts in the extensive life science network that I have built over the years,” Jakobsson commented.

Focus on personalised healthcare

Kongsberg Beam Technology is a company focused on improving proton therapy in oncology. There are 20 million cancer cases every year and many cancer patients benefit from radiation therapy. The disadvantage is that radiation therapy has several side effects on healthy tissue. Proton therapy allows more control as to exactly where the energy from the particles is released, without damaging healthy tissue surrounding the tumour.

“With proton therapy, the dosage is delivered to a more specific target, the tumour. The dosage is considerably less in the surrounding healthy areas, which can make a noticeable difference for the occurrence of side effects,” said Jakobsson.

“Using artificial intelligence and digital twins, it will be possible to control the proton beam in real-time during treatment.”

Kongsberg Beam Technology develops a steering system called MAMA-K that will make proton therapy even more personalised and precise, and with MAMA-K the full potential of proton therapy can be achieved. Using artificial intelligence and digital twins, it will be possible to control the proton beam in real-time during treatment, even when the patients or their organs are inadvertently moving.

“Kongsberg Beam Technology is an interesting company, because the technology is highly advanced, and the management are extremely skilled and experienced. There is a solid market need, with a large potential for growth, and there is a long-term vision connected to the construction of two new proton therapy facilities in Norway,” Jakobsson explained.

The future for proton therapy

Proton therapy is emerging as a critical treatment method against cancer, which is why Norway are building two proton centres. The centres are planned to be completed in 2024 and are located at the Radium Hospital in Oslo and Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen. Kongsberg Beam Technology already has a collaboration agreement with the Radium Hospital, which is a part of Oslo University Hospital (a comprehensive cancer centre), to use the prospective facilities to test the MAMA-K system.

“The unique thing about Kongsberg Beam Technology is the strong collaboration between the Kongsberg industry, Oslo Cancer Cluster, Oslo University Hospital and the university.”

“The unique thing about Kongsberg Beam Technology is the strong collaboration between the Kongsberg industry, Oslo Cancer Cluster, Oslo University Hospital and the university. Spearhead knowledge from the Kongsberg industry is the basis for the technology. Oslo Cancer Cluster has provided a network in oncology which has made it possible to take the patented ideas further. We are essentially identifying the bottle necks in proton therapy to deliver solutions for the treatment centres,” said Jakobsson.

The plan for 2021 was to attract NOK 10 million in private placements. Less than two days after the first investor presentation, the emission was oversubscribed to NOK 13 million. Now, the company’s focus is to deliver a proof of concept within the next 12 months. The Norwegian Research Council is already supporting the company during this development phase with NOK 23 million.

Do you want to learn more?

Get in touch with Kerstin Jakobsson at kerstin.jakobsson@kongsbergbeamtech.com

Listen to Jakobsson’s guest appearance in the Radium podcast: Episode 161 by Radforsk Investeringsstiftelse (in Norwegian/Swedish only)

Read about Kongsberg Beam Technology in the following news articles: (in Norwegian only)

Previous articles on oslocancercluster.no about Kongsberg Beam Technology:

Dr Deborah Owen, Partner, Dehns, is looking forward to help Norwegian companies in the cancer field. Photo: Dehns

Dehns acquires Norwegian office

Dr Deborah Owen, Partner, Dehns. Photo: Dehns

Our member Dehns announced this week that the company will set up a local office in Oslo.

The law firm Dehns has acquired the Norwegian Intellectual Property consultancy firm Leogriff. This means Dehns will now have an active Norwegian presence with a local office in Oslo.

Dehns is a law firm specialized in patents and trademarks. Dehns’ attorneys have insight in many different technologies in the engineering, chemistry and biotechnology sectors.

With this acquisition, Dehns gains the highly-experienced Leogriff team with all their additional competencies, skills and expertise in Intellectual Property. Leogriff’s clients include companies, investors, research institutes and universities.

What does this mean for Norwegian companies in cancer innovation and life science?

“Companies in the cancer field and life science sector face many challenges and need an excellent network of advisors to navigate these successfully.”
Dr Deborah Owen, Partner, Dehns.

“Intellectual Property (IP) issues are key to such companies at all stages, and we are delighted that the opening of the Dehns’ Norwegian office provides an expansion of the Dehns’ team to provide even greater experience and expertise in areas relating to IP management and strategy consultancy, which will be of real benefit to Norwegian companies of all sizes in these sectors,” continued Owen.

Dehns was founded in 1920 and is one of Europe’s leading firms of patent and trademark attorneys. The company has more than 230 staff across 8 offices: London, Munich, Oxford, Brighton, Manchester, Bristol, Sandwich and, now, Oslo.

Dr Adrian Samuels, Partner, Dehns. Photo: Dehns

Dr Adrian Samuels, Partner, Dehns. Photo: Dehns

“We are delighted that, having been working closely with Norwegian innovators and industry leaders for over half a century, Dehns’ ongoing success will be supported by this direct investment in Norway.”
Adrian Samuels, Partner, Dehns.

For more information, please read Dehns’ press release or visit Dehns official website.

Ønsker virtuelle studier til Norge

This article was originally published on our member Inven2’s website and written by Elisabeth Kirkeng Andersen in Norwegian. Oslo Cancer Cluster supports this member’s initiative of introducing virtual clinical studies to Norway.

Inven2 håper at vi snart kan starte såkalte virtuelle kliniske studier på oppdrag fra industri i Norge. Virtuelle kliniske studier innebærer utstrakt bruk av digitale verktøy for å samle inn dataene som er nødvendig for at et legemiddel kan godkjennes. Oslo universitetssykehus og legemiddelfirmaet Bristol Myers Squibb (BMS) er veldig positive.

–Vi har alle forutsetninger for å lykkes med virtuelle studier og det kan være et stort fortrinn for å tiltrekke flere kliniske studier til Norge, sier Siri Kolle. Hun er ansvarlig for kliniske studier i Inven2.

Virtuelle studier kalles også «Decentralised Clinical Trials», og går blant annet ut på å ta i bruk digitale verktøy og avstandsoppfølging av studiedeltakere.

Det svenske Läkemedelsverket er i gang med en kartlegging i Sverige for å finne ut hva som kreves for å  gjennomføre virtuelle kliniske studier på en sikker og effektiv måte, og hva som allerede er på plass.

Jenny Söderberg er prosjektleder for dette og påpeker i en pressemelding at nær 70% av potensielle deltagere til kliniske studier er utelukket på grunn av geografiske hensyn.

–Jeg vil tro det samme gjelder for Norge. Dette viser hvilket enormt potensiale for bedre pasientbehandling som ligger i virtuelle studier. Ikke minst kan virtuelle studier bety bedre, bredere og raskere rekruttering til en studie, noe som er det viktigste får både firmaene og pasientene, sier Kolle.

Siri Kolle, ansvarlig for kliniske studier i Inven2.

Legemiddelindustrien på ballen

Kolle synes det svenske pilotprosjektet er spennende, og følger spent med på det og andre initiativ rundt virtuelle studier. Hun og kollegaene i Inven2 har allerede gjennomført en forundersøkelse ved Oslo universitetssykehus, basert på at de i starten av 2020 fikk flere henvendelser fra legemiddelfirmaer om hva som er mulig å gjøre innen virtuelle studier i Norge i dag.

–Både videoløsninger for pasientkonsultasjon og elektronisk samtykke kan enkelt tas i bruk allerede. I tillegg har vi sendt flere store legemiddelfirmaer kravspesifikasjonene som Oslo universitetssykehus har, på bruk av informasjonssystemer, så de er informert om retningslinjene sykehuset har på dette, sier Kolle.

Det setter Susanne Hedenstedt stor pris på. Susanne er senior prosjektleder for kliniske studier i Norden i biopharma selskapet BMS, hvor hun også er med i en intern, global, arbeidsgruppe innen virtuelle kliniske studier.

–Virtuelle studier bobler i verden. Det er mange legemiddelfirmaer som ser på muligheten for å gjennomføre hele eller deler av studiene sine digitalt. BMS planlegger å starte opp en virtuell oppfølgingsstudie innen kreft i løpet av 2020, og vi håper å få med et norsk sykehus i den studien, sier Hedenstedt.

Hedenstedt er tydelig på at BMS ønsker å gå i gang med virtuelle kliniske studier, og tror dette kan være en «gamechanger» for pasientene og for utvikling av nye behandlinger, i alle fall innen noen sykdommer.

– Pasientrekruttering er en av de største utfordringene i kliniske studier. Det tar lang tid og forsinker hele prosessen med eventuelt å få godkjent en ny behandling. I tillegg skjer det ofte at en del av pasientene ikke fullfører hele studieperioden. Det kan være på grunn av sykdommen eller andre faktorer, som reisevei. Det er tøft for svært syke pasienter å reise tur-retur til et sykehus hvor studiene gjennomføres. Gjennom virtuelle studier kan vi involvere pasienten på en mer hensiktsmessig måte i deres eget hjem, sier Hedenstedt.

Koronapandemien har satt fortgang i arbeidet med virtuelle studier i BMS. Den globale unntaktstilstanden har ført til at BMS, som ett av mange legemiddelfirmaer, har satt en midlertidig pause for oppstart av nye studier og rekruttering av pasienter til kliniske studier.

– Vi har tatt disse proaktive grepene for å beskytte og ta vare på sikkerheten til både studiedeltakere, våre ansatte og de ansatte på sykehusene som jobber med kliniske studier, sier Hedenstedt.

Hun påpeker at pausen også er satt for å sikre at studiene gjennomføres i tråd med regulatoriske retningslinjer og at dataene holder høy vitenskapelig kvalitet.

–Koronapandemien kommer til å føre til en eksplosjon av virtuelle studier. Det er veldig positivt at Inven2 ønsker å bidra til å innføre dette i Norge, sier Hedenstedt.

Oslo universitetssykehus er positivt innstilt

Så hva er egentlig den største forskjellen på en vanlig klinisk studie og en virtuell, desentralisert klinisk studie?

Begrepet desentralisert er beskrivende, fordi hovedforskjellen er at studieoppfølgingen flyttes så mye som mulig fra et sykehus hjem til den enkelte pasienten. Han eller hun bruker sitt lokale legekontor for blodprøver, og ulike digitale løsninger for å rapportere inn data i studien. Mer avanserte undersøkelser som MR, PET-skan og røntgen må fremdeles gjennomføres på sykehus.

I Norge har begrepet telemedisin gjerne blitt brukt om denne typen oppfølging av pasienter

Telemedisin er et område Norge er langt framme på internasjonalt, på grunn av vår spredte befolkning som i store deler av landet bor langt unna sykehus eller fastlegekontor.

–Det norske helsevesen sin lange erfaring med telemedisin innebærer at vi har alle forutsetninger for å være et foregangsland innen virtuelle studier, sier Kolle.

Noen flere elementer må på plass for å gå fra telemedisin til virtuell gjennomføring av kliniske studier.

–Elektronisk samtykke fra pasientene til å delta i en studie er et element, videokonsultasjoner med lege eller studiepersonell er et annet, og i tillegg kommer utstrakt innsamling av pasientrapporterte data. I dette ligger det at pasienten selv rapporterer om egen fysisk og psykisk helse basert på egen erfaring og helsedata hentet fra ulike former for «wearables», det vil si en pulsklokke eller lignende som måler blodtrykk og andre vitale funksjoner, sier Kolle.

Alle disse tre elementene er i bruk i helsevesenet i dag, sier Peder Utne. Utne leder avdeling for administrativ forskningsstøtte ved Oslo universitetssykehus.

–Digitale verktøy brukes i stor grad i forskerinitierte studier, og det er ingenting i veien for å ta det i bruk i industrisponsede studier. Det som må være på plass er selvfølgelige datasikkerhet, det vil si at de digitale løsningene er trygge i bruk for deltagerne og i tråd med internasjonale retningslinjer for personvern, sier Utne.

Et eksempel på en pågående, virtuell studie i Norge, er koronastudien der Oslo universitetssykehus kartlegger risiko for å bli smittet av koronaviruset. Her bruker de både elektronisk samtykke og spørreskjema for å innhente egenrapporterte data. Så langt har studien over 100.000 deltagere.

–Vi er veldig positive til virtuelle kliniske studier. På et generelt grunnlag mener jeg det meste er på plass for å gjennomføre dette. Det vil være noen utfordringer som er avhengig av den enkelte studiens design. Dette kan gjelde de spesifikke systemene som skal tas i bruk for å hente inn data, samt utfordringer knyttet til personvern og datasikkerhet, samt hvordan endringer i en virtuell studie skal rapporteres til Regional Etisk Komite´(REK), som er ansvarlig for å godkjenne studien, sier Utne.

Han mener at koronapandemien kan være enkelthendelsen som sparker i gang et stort digitalt løft innen helsektoren som en helhet.

–Det er nok på mange måter sånn at legemiddelindustrien har vært for tradisjonell når det gjelder gjennomføringen av kliniske studier, så det blir spennende å se hva som kommer nå, sier Utne.

Les en god beskrivelse av forskjellene på en vanlig kliniske studie og en virtuell kliniske studie i denne forskningsartikkelen «Virtual clinical trials: Perspectives in Dermatology».

Korona med digitalt dytt

Koronapandemien har ført til at videkonsultasjoner har blitt tatt i bruk som aldri før ved norske sykehus. Det fortalte flere av landets fremste kreftleger på et webinar Dagens Medisin arrangerte i mars, om hvordan koronapandemien har påvirket kreftbehandlingen i Norge.

–Pandemien har tvunget oss alle til å tenke nytt og ta i bruk digitale verktøy på en annen måte en før. Se på skolesektoren hvordan lærerne fra én dag til en annen måtte ta i bruk videoverktøy for å undervise. Det samme har skjedd med de ansatte i helsesektoren, som fra en dag til en annen måtte forholde seg til pasienter som ikke ønsket å møte opp på sykehuset i frykt for å bli smittet der eller på reisen, eller pasienter som ikke burde utsette seg for risikoen. I noen tilfeller er videokonsultasjon med pasienter enklere og mer effektivt, for både pasient og behandler, sier Kolle.

Hun mener Norge bør utnytte det digitale momentumet koronapandemien har medført, til å endre praksis innen kliniske studier og utføre så mye som mulig digitalt framover.

–Koronapandemien påvirket fra midten av mars av gjennomføringen av pågående studier og særlig oppstart av nye kliniske studier i Norge, siden de store sykehusene alle var i gul beredskap. I en slik global krisesituasjon er digitale verktøy gull verdt for å gjennomføre kliniske studier som normalt på tross av unntakstilstanden, det er det beste for pasientene, sier Kolle.

Nå melder sykehusene i Norge at de er i gang igjen med både pågående studier og oppstarten av nye. Det er ikke tilfellet i verden generelt, særlig land som har blitt sterkt rammet av koronapandemien som Italia, Spania, Storbritannia og USA, melder om store forsinkelser.

–Oppsiden med å ta i bruk virtuelle studier er så mange, så dette må vi få til. I tillegg må vi ta inn over oss at ønsker vi flere kliniske studier til Norge i fremtiden, er vi helt avhengige av å være med på utviklingen og ta i bruk nye verktøy, sier Kolle.

Hun har på vegne av Inven2 spilt inn nødvendigheten av å satse på virtuelle kliniske studier til den nye handlingsplanen for kliniske studier som Helse- og omsorgsdepartementet arbeider med nå.

New member: Ledidi

Image of Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park

In this article series, we will introduce the new members that have joined our oncology ecosystem in the last six months. Follow us for a new article next week!

One of the latest additions to our cluster organisation is Ledidi, a Norwegian technology start-up that wants to revolutionize how data is processed in clinical research.

Ledidi was founded in 2016 by three software engineers and two academic clinicians in cancer research. The company has since then developed a software solution that will help hospital personnel and medical researchers to sort, organise and analyse real-time data.

We talked to Jakob Markussen, VP Business Development and Sales at Ledidi, to learn more about how they are changing the field of cancer and why they wanted to belong to Oslo Cancer Cluster.

Could you briefly describe Ledidi and the role it is taking in cancer?

“Ledidi AS has developed and is marketing Prjcts, which is an end-to-end software solution designed for clinical research. Ledidi was founded in 2016 by three software engineers and two academic clinicians with long track-record within cancer research, cellular immunology and cancer surgery. Prjcts is a cloud-based solution that integrates data registry with statistical analyses and table and graph production in one package with a user-friendly interface. Pjrcts is an ideal cloud solution for all kinds of collaborative research projects from small internal quality registries to multicenter international studies. By integrating the complete workflow, Prjcts provide a platform that enables all project members to take part in the data analysis and presentation, and not only data acquisition,” said Markussen.

Why did Ledidi join Oslo Cancer Cluster?

“Oslo Cancer Cluster represents a unique partner for an exchange of expertise, partnership and networking. The spectrum of companies, institutions and organizations that Oslo Cancer Cluster brings together gives Ledidi a valuable opportunity to contribute to cancer research and stimulate research collaborations,” said Markussen.

 

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Reports from the third quarter from our members have been published. Photo: Unsplash

What’s new in Q3?

Two persons working in front a two laptops.

Positive results from clinical trials, revenue growth and new clinical collaborations … Read some of the third quarter developments from our members below.

BerGenBio logo

BerGenBio

  • BerGenBio showed results from their clinical trial for patients with non-small cell lung cancer, who have previously been treated with chemotherapy. The results showed they met primary and secondary endpoints.
  • The company presented interim safety data from a Phase Ib/II trial. They are testing their drug bemcentinib in combination with pembrolizumab on melanoma patients. The data shows the combination is well tolerated by patients.
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted bemcentinib Fast Track Designation. This means they will do an expedited review of the investigational drug. The designation is for the treatment of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), who have relapsed.

Read more in the press release from BerGenBio

Nordic Nanovector logo

Nordic Nanovector

  • Nordic Nanovector raised approximately NOK 243 million in private placement of new shares. This will provide further funds to continue the clinical development of their drug Betalutin, manufacturing and other commercial activities.
  • The company presented new results from a clinical trial, testing their drug Betalutin on patients with non-Hodgkins lymphoma (a type of blood cancer). The median duration of response was 13.6 months for all responders and 32.0 months for complete responders.
  • The company reported 3 out of 3 patient responses in the first patient cohort in one of their clinical trials. The patients were given Betalutin in combination with rituximab to treat 3rd-line relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (also a type of blood cancer).

Read more in the press release from Nordic Nanovector

Photocure logo

Photocure

  • Photocure reported a revenue growth of 42% in local currency for the US market.
  • The revenues in the Nordics declined 7% to NOK 9.9 million (NOK 10.6 million) in the third quarter.
  • The company entered into a licensing agreement with Asieris Meditech Co. to commercialize the product Cevira to the global market. Cevira is a non-invasive photodynamic therapy for HPV-related (cervical) diseases.

Read more in the press release from Photocure

 

Targovax logo

Targovax

  • Targovax presented new data from the first part of the clinical trial of their oncolytic virus. The trial has shown clinical responses in three out of nine patients. This treatment targets patients with refractory advanced melanoma (skin cancer).
  • The company announced an expansion of the clinical trial of the oncolytic virus ONCOS-102 in combination with the checkpoint inhibitor Imfinzi. This trial is open for patients with advanced peritoneal malignancies (a rare cancer that develops in the tissue that lines the abdomen).
  • The company publicised that Oslo University Hospital will become a site for the clinical trial of their oncolytic virus ONCOS-102.

Read more in the press release from Targovax

 

Ultimovacs logo

Ultimovacs

  • Ultimovacs presented long-term results from the clinical study of their therapeutic cancer vaccine UV1. The patients have non-small cell lung cancer and the trial has shown a 4-year overall survival rate of 39% (7 of 18 patients are still alive).
  • New data from their prostate cancer trial showed a 5-year overall survival rate of 50% (11 of 22 patients are still alive).
  • A phase II clinical trial for patients with malignant melanoma (skin cancer) is projected to start in the first quarter of 2020.

Read more in the press release from Ultimovacs

 

More third quarter reports from our other members are or will be made available on their respective websites.

 

New report: Cancer in Norway 2018

Cancer Registry of Norway has released the report Cancer in Norway. These are the main points. 

Since the 1950s, Cancer Registry of Norway has published statistical reports of the cancer incidence in Norway almost annually. The past 14 editions of these reports can be found online on the Cancer Registry’s official report page.

In 2018, 34 190 new cancer cases were reported. In order to understand how cancer changes over time in the population, the Cancer Registry examines rates over five-year periods.

Differences between men and women

18 321 men were diagnosed with cancer in 2018.

These are the most common cancer types among men:

  • Prostate cancer, 27,9%
  • Lung cancer, 9,3%
  • Colon cancer, 7,9%
  • Cancer in the urinary tract, 6,9%
  • Skin cancer, non-melanoma, 6,1%

In men, the rates for all cancers combined have been stable. Rates for prostate and lung cancer are decreasing, and so are the rates for rectum cancer, while the trend for colon cancer points slightly upwards.

15 869 women were diagnosed with cancer in 2018.

These are the most common cancer types among women:

  • Breast cancer, 22,3%
  • Colon cancer, 10,1%
  • Lung cancer, 10,0%
  • Melanoma, 6,8%
  • Skin cancer, non-melanoma, 6,4%

There has been a 5,6% increase in the rates among women from the previous five-year period to the most recent one. This reflects increased rates of breast, colon, lung and skin cancer.

Cancer rates by immigrant group

This year the report Cancer in Norway presents cancer rates by immigrant group for the first time.

At the beginning of 2019 immigrants represented 14,3% of the Norwegian population. According to Statistics Norway, about 48% of the immigrants are from Europe, 14% from Africa and 34% from Asia, leaving another 4% from the rest of the world.

Immigrants from outside Europe tend to have lower cancer rates than people born in Norway, the report shows.

In the report foreword Giske Ursin, Director of Cancer Registry of Norway, writes:

“Cancer is predominantly a disease caused by western lifestyle and environment, and many immigrants bring with them a healthier lifestyle associated with lower cancer rates. We may all profit from learning and adapting to a healthier lifestyle.”

Although long-term trends among immigrants tend to be favourable, there are some noteworthy exceptions, according to the report. Immigrants from countries with high smoking prevalence, such as a number of the Eastern European countries, have higher rates of lung cancer.

Socioeconomic factors also matter

The special issue of the report goes in depth on rates among immigrants and also by socioeconomic factors. These factors also matter, according to Giske Ursin:

“We know that socioeconomic status plays a role for several cancers, and a key question is whether there are independent effects linked to income, education and immigrant status. We therefore examine all three factors. We found that a number of cancers are more common among those who have short education or low income. However, we found that the differences between immigrant groups remain after adjustment for socioeconomic factors.”

This information can be used to reduce cancer risk, according to the Cancer Registry – but one size does not fit all in terms of prevention. Ursin writes:

“We need a more targeted approach if we are to prevent cancer in all population subgroups at higher risk of cancer.”

Read the report

  • Cancer in Norway 2018 – Cancer incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence in Norway is available in a printed version. The report is free of charge, and can be ordered by sending an email to kreftregisteret@kreftregisteret.no
  • Or download the report, in English and Norwegian, from the website of the Cancer Registry of Norway
  • The special issue part about immigrants and socioeconomic factors is only available in Norwegian for the time being

 

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Geir Harstad, CEO of Smartfish, is encouraged by clinical study results indicating that the company's medical nutrition has the potential to enhance the efficacy of standard cancer treatments. Photo: Smartfish

Smartfish with clinical study results

Geir Harstad, CEO of Smartfish,

A new clinical study indicates that medical nutrition can improve overall survival in lung cancer patients. 

Oslo Cancer Cluster member Smartfish AS presented the results from a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in the beginning of September. It evaluated one of the company’s medical nutrition products in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (the most common type of lung cancer) suffering from cachexia.

Cachexia is a complex wasting syndrome, known to have a negative impact on clinical outcomes in patients with cancer and several other chronic diseases.

It is characterised by an ongoing loss of muscle and weight, that eventually can kill the patient.

The results show that the nutrition has a favorable safety profile and indicate a number of positive effects on clinical outcome, for instance that the patients who received the nutrition experienced numerically fewer adverse events from their chemotherapy treatments than the comparator group.

The clinical study

In the pilot study, lung cancer patients who received the nutrition while being pre-cachectic had a statistically significant higher survival after 12 months from baseline compared to the comparator group. 56 patients from 16 clinical sites in Sweden, Italy, Slovakia and Croatia were randomized to receive either Smartfish’s medical nutrition product or a milk-based isocaloric drink.

“This study shows the potential of Remune as an important enhancer of standard cancer care and clinical data like this helps to build awareness of what targeted medical nutrition can do for patients. We are encouraged to continue our research and development to ensure that the best possible nutrition is delivered to the patients who need it.” Geir Harstad, CEO of Smartfish

The medical nutrition product that was tested is called Remune, and is a juice-based drink produced with a proprietary emulsion technology containing unique high levels of Omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D and whey protein.

The study was recently published online in the journal Nutrition and Cancer and can be read following this link: “Safety and Tolerability of Targeted Medical Nutrition for Cachexia in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Pilot Trial” .

About Smartfish AS

Smartfish AS is active in the research, development, production and marketing of advanced and clinically documented nutritional drinks within medical nutrition and sports nutrition. All Smartfish products are produced on its proprietary juice-based emulsion technology platform with the marine DHA and EPA fatty acids as important ingredients. Smartfish has a number of ongoing clinical development projects and studies in close collaboration with researchers and institutions both in Norway and internationally. The company was founded in 2001 and is located in Oslo, Norway and Lund, Sweden. Smartfish’s main shareholders are Investinor (Norway) and Industrifonden (Sweden). For more information, visit SmartFish official website.

For more information about the study and the company, please contact Jens Nordahl, VP Sales & Marketing, tel +47 996 299 99.

The company’s press release can be read as a PDF in this link.

 

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Meet our new members

Oslo Cancer Cluster proudly presents the new members that have joined our organisation during the second quarter of 2019.

The new members represent a valuable addition to our non-profit member organisation, which encompasses the whole oncology value chain. By being a part of Oslo Cancer Cluster, our members are connected to a global network with many relevant key players in the cancer research field. Our members contribute to this unique ecosystem and ensure the development of innovative cancer treatments to improve patients’ lives.

 

theradex logo

 

Theradex Oncology

Theradex Oncology provides global clinical development services exclusively to companies developing new cancer treatments. The company has a strong emphasis on early drug development. It provides regulatory and medical support for companies taking cancer treatments into clinical development in the US and Europe.

Theradex Oncology staff has participated in educational events at Oslo Cancer Cluster for a number of years. This is how they became familiar with the cluster.

“Oslo Cancer Cluster provides a unique opportunity to share knowledge with other professionals dedicated to developing new cancer treatments.” Meg Valnoski, President Theradex Oncology

Meg Valnoski explains how the company has been supporting the development of cancer treatments for over 30 years and experienced the advancements in cancer treatments over that time.

 “We are always working to expand our knowledge and experience in cancer drug development to support our partnerships with companies developing new therapies for cancer treatment.”

Catapult life science logo

Catapult Life Science

Catapult Life Science is a centre established to bridge the gap between the lab and the industry, providing infrastructure, equipment and expertise for product development and industrialisation in Norway. It has been formed as a result of joint efforts from a range of different players with a common goal of enabling more industrialisation of life science research in Norway, truly what the Norwegians call a dugnad.

“We see Oslo Cancer Cluster as a key partner for realising our purpose, which is to create new opportunities for product development and industrialisation in Norway.” Astrid Hilde Myrset, CEO Catapult Life Science

Myrset adds:

“Our vision is ‘Bringing science to life’, which implies enabling new ideas to a be developed in Norway for new employment in the pharma industry, new growth in the Norwegian economy, and last but not least, new products to the market, enabling a longer and healthier life for patients.”

 

This post is part of a series of articles, which will introduce the new members of our organisation every three months.

  • To find out who else is involved in Oslo Cancer Cluster, view the full list of members
  • Follow us on Facebook or subscribe to our newsletter to always stay up to date!

 

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The High Throughput Screening Lab at SINTEF. Photo: Thor Nielsen / SINTEF

SINTEF to develop methods in immuno-oncology

The Cell Lab at SINTEF. Photo: Thor Nielsen / SINTEF

SINTEF and Catapult Life Science are looking for new partners to develop methodology for cancer immunotherapy.

“We want to develop methods within immunotherapy, because this is currently the most successful strategy for improving cancer treatments and one of the main directions in modern medicine,” says Einar Sulheim, Research Scientist at SINTEF.

The Norwegian research organization SINTEF is an Oslo Cancer Cluster member with extensive knowledge in characterisation, analysis, drug discovery and development of conventional drugs.

The new project on methodology for cancer immunotherapy recently started in April 2019 and is a collaboration with Catapult Life Science, a new Oslo Cancer Cluster member. The aim is to help academic groups and companies develop their immunotherapy drug candidates and ideas.

Help cancer patients

Ultimately, the main aim is of course that the project will benefit cancer patients. Immunotherapy has shown to both increase life expectancy and create long term survivors in patient groups with very poor prognosis.

“We hope that this project can help streamline the development and production of immunotherapeutic drugs and help cancer patients by helping drug candidates through the stages before clinical trials.” Einar Sulheim, Research Scientist at SINTEF

 

Develop methodology

The project is a SINTEF initiative spending NOK 12,5 million from 2019 to 2023. SINTEF wants to develop methodology and adapt technology in high throughput screening to help develop products for cancer immunotherapy. This will include in vitro high throughput screening of drug effect in both primary cells and cell lines, animal models, pathology, and production of therapeutic cells and antibodies.

 

High throughput screening is the use of robotic liquid handling systems (automatic pipettes) to perform experiments. This makes it possible not only to handle small volumes and sample sizes with precision, but also to run wide screens with thousands of wells where drug combinations and concentrations can be tested in a variety of cells.

 

The Cell Lab at SINTEF. Photo: Thor Nielsen / SINTEF

The Cell Lab at SINTEF. Photo: Thor Nielsen / SINTEF

 

Bridging the gap

Catapult Life Science is a centre established to bridge the gap between the lab and the industry by providing infrastructure, equipment and expertise for product development and industrialisation in Norway. Their aim is to stimulate growth in the Norwegian economy by enabling a profitable health industry.

“In this project, our role will be to assess the industrial relevance of the new technologies developed, for instance by evaluating analytical methods used for various phases of drug development.” Astrid Hilde Myrset, CEO Catapult Life Science

A new product could for example be produced for testing in clinical studies according to regulatory requirements at Catapult, once the centre achieves its manufacturing license next year.

“If a new method is intended for use in quality control of a new regulatory drug, Catapult’s role can be to validate the method according to the regulatory requirements” Myrset adds. 

SINTEF and Catapult Life Science are now looking for partners.

Looking for new partners

Einar Sulheim sums up the ideal partners for this project:

“We are interested in partners developing cancer immunotherapies that see challenges in their experimental setups in terms of magnitude, standardization or facilities. Through this project, SINTEF can contribute with internal funding to develop methods that suit their purpose.”

 

Interested in this project?