Debating the possibilities of a Norwegian health industry: Ketil Widerberg (Oslo Cancer Cluster), Kathrine Myhre (Norway Health Tech), Monica Larsen (LMI), Hans Eirik Melandsø (Innovation Norway) and Anne Kjersti Fahlvik (The Research Council of Norway).

Can Norway compete internationally on health?

Can Norway take a leading international position within the health industry? This was the main question for one of our discussions at Arendalsuka last week.

A report released in April this year shows a Norwegian health industry on the rise. However internationally, Norway is still comparatively small even compared to our Nordic neighbors.

SEE VIDEO FROM THE MEETING (Facebook, in Norwegian)

See our other events during Arendaluka:

  1. Fremtidens kreftbehandling i Arendal (In Norwegian)
  2. Tim: Pasienten som kommer hjem (In Norwegian)

Feasibility study
Oslo Cancer Cluster, Norway Health Tech, LMI, Innovation Norway and the The Research Council of Norway have, based on the ambition of creating a profitable health industry in Norway, conducted a feasibility study regarding the strategical positioning of the Norwegian health industry. 30 key position holders within the industry have contributed to the report, giving their views on how Norway can build a stronger health industry.

READ THE REPORT

The event in Arendal featured a a debate panel consisting of Ketil Widerberg from Oslo Cancer Cluster, Kathrine Myhre from Norway Health Tech, Monica Larsen from Legemiddelindustriforeningen, Hans Eirik Melandsø from Innovasjon Norge and Anne Kjersti Fahlvik from The Research Council of Norway.

Collaboration key
Collaboration between public institutions and the innovative private sector is important to create a health industry of some size, both according to the report published in April and the participants in the Arendal-panel. Oslo Cancer Cluster facilitates this kind of innovative public-private collaboration.

– We represent the whole value chain when it comes to cancer treatment and innovation. Research institutions, hospitals, as well as both small and large companies, Ketil Widerberg explained.

One example of how Oslo Cancer Cluster contributes to a functioning health industry is the new Car-T cancer treatment developed by Novartis. Important research and treatment conducted by the department of cell therapy at the Radium hospital is funded for clinical studies by the pharmaceutical company Novartis, the production is made possible by Norwegian innovations from Thermo Fischer, while the Norwegian Medicines Agency works hard securing international treatment approval.

– This type of collaboration saves lives while creating employment and income, said Widerberg.

Three ways to recreate success
The question is how do we recreate these type of success stories, and Widerberg emphasized three different aspects: More clinical studies, releasing the shackles on our health data and cultivating high-end research.

– Today, a successful Norwegian Centre of Excellence loses it’s funding after 10 years. If the research is a success, it should be doubled, he said.

New report on Norwegian health industry

Will the Norwegian health industry become a so-called growth industry? What kind of position can a Norwegian health industry claim internationally? 

These questions are at the core of a new report on the Norwegian health industry, published by Innovation Norway. According to Innovation Norway, health is one of six areas of opportunity for Norwegian export growth.

The Norwegian health industry is already increasing. It had a 57 billion NOK turnover last year, of which 23,6 billion in exports, mostly from companies producing in Norway.

New report out
Oslo Cancer Cluster, Norway Health Tech, Legemiddelindustriforeningen, Innovation Norway and the Norwegian Research Council have recently finished a feasibility study on the strategic position of a Norwegian health industry. 30 key position holders within the industry have contributed to the report, giving their views on how Norway can build a stronger health industry.

READ THE REPORT (in Norwegian)

Questions to be answered
How should we approach an expansion of the industry? What will become increasingly more important for this industry in the years to come? How should the public system contribute?

These questions will also appear in our meeting about the Norwegian health industry in Arendal, 16 August. Please join us in Arendal!

Previous reports
Menon Economics has previously published reports about the Norwegian health industry, commissioned by Oslo Cancer Cluster, Norway Health Tech, Legemiddelindustriforeningen, Innovation Norway and the Norwegian Research Council. Their latest report was published in April 2018. That report is available here (in Norwegian).

Meet Us at Arendalsuka

In mid-August Oslo Cancer Cluster travel to Arendal to put focus on cancer treatment and innovation.

Arendalsuka is a week of political discourse and interaction, and Oslo Cancer Cluster want to highlight several cancer related topics we find important. In total, we are hosting or co-hosting three different events!

On Wednesday August the 15th we are involved in two events. We start off early at Clarion Arendal by looking in to the glass bowl and predicting the future of cancer treatment. In the afternoon we discuss if digital technology can aid patients recovering from cancer treatment. Finally, on Thursday we ask: How can we promote the Norwegian Health Industry? What should we do and what should we avoid?

Browse our event in Norwegian.

Or better: Come and join us at Arendal!

The Future Norway: Ketil Widerberg on Tech and Cancer

Our General Manager Ketil Widerberg visited the podcast People creating the future Norway (De som bygger det nye Norge) hosted by Silvija Seres and Oslo Business Forum.

Ketil and Silvija discussed important issues like: Is it possible to make cancer a chronic disease? And how do you really create medicine that is tailored for each individual? And many other important topics. Have a listen!

Listen to the podcast HERE (In Norwegian).