Four Cluster Companies Get Innovation Reward

Nacamed, Phoenix Soulutions, NorGenoTech and Clever Health are awarded Innovasjonsrammen for good early-stage innovation and collaboration. Innovasjonsrammen is awarded by Oslo Cancer Cluster with money from Innovation Norway. Congratulations!

Important with early financing
Early financing while companies are establishing their business is often limited, but can be crucial to get important projects off the ground. Therefore, Innovation Norway has given Oslo Cancer Cluster 1000 000 NOK to reward excellent innovation and collaboration activity at an early stage. A cluster is all about reaping the benefits of collaboration and Oslo Cancer Cluster has awarded the Innovasjonsrammen-money to four of their promising member companies. Hopefully this will inspire other potential financers to support Norwegian bio businesses at an early stage.

Prize money awarded
NorGenoTech AS     150 000 NOK
Clever Health           100 000 NOK
Phoenix Solutions    500 000 NOK
Nacamed                 150 000 NOK

Hanne Mette Kristiansen from Innovation Norway and Ketil Widerberg from Oslo Cancer Cluster, as well as Bjørn Klem form Oslo Cancer Cluster Incubator, handed out checks for Innovasjonsrammen. Her received by Sergey Shaposhnikov from NorGenoTech, Jon-Bendik Thue from Clever Health, Per Christian Sontum from Phoenix Solutions and Christina Westerveld Haug and Lars Gunnar Fledsberg from Nacamed.

Bringing Together Tech Knowledge
At the 5th floor of Oslo Cancer Cluster the four companies each received their innovation award handed out by Hanne Mette Kristiansen from Innovation Norway, Ketil Widerberg from Oslo Cancer Cluster and Bjørn Klem from Oslo cancer Cluster Incubator.

Ketil Widerberg, General Manager at Oslo Cancer Cluster, thanked Innovation Norway for providing the money and the panel of experts that helped pick the four deserved winners. – This money helps to remove some risk from the early stages of the innovation process, said Widerberg.

Bjørn Klem from Oslo Cancer Cluster Incubator added that it had been a very difficult process choosing the winners from the eight companies that applied. However, giving out prize money requires hard choices and he applauded the versatility at display.

–I think it is interesting that the four companies represent four different approaches within cancer research. Four different technologies. And getting them together here today is what Oslo Cancer Cluster and the incubator is all about: Getting different people together sharing knowledge and impulses!

Hanne Mette Kristiansen from Innovation Norway explained that Innovasjonsrammen was a way of reaching out to companies that usually avoided their attention. Startups that had not yet attracted any serious business attention, but nevertheless had very promising projects.

About the companies
Sergey Shaposhnikov from NorGenoTech explained that the money was coming in very handy. They are a company, as he explained it, straight out of the lab. Now they could start turning their research into business.

Clever Health has a more customer or patient oriented focus in their business model. Jon-Bendik Thue from Clever Health explained how a widespread disease as prostate cancer needs a way of differentiating between the patients that need treatment and the ones that do not.

Per Christian Sontum from Phoenix Solutions was very thankful for the award and money. He showed everybody how ultrasound can be way of targeting cancer cells with precision drug delivery.

And the event was elegantly rounded off by Christina Westerveld Haug and Lars Gunnar Fledsberg from Nacamed. Nacamed’s business goal is to produce nanoparticles of silicon material for targeted drug delivery of chemotherapy, radiation therapy and diagnostics to kill cancer cells. She explained that the money would be put in use straight away. Preparing for important trials after Christmas.

NOME Important to BioIndustry Growth

Nordic Mentor Network for Entrepreneurship (NOME) will be an important piece of the puzzle if Norway is going to fulfill their ambitions set by the coming White Paper on the Healthcare Industry.

If we are to make our bioindustry more competitive and take a leading European role within eHealth, we need to learn from the best in the business. NOME is a program that aims to lift Nordic life sciences to the very top by using mentors.

The Norwegian Parliament’s Health Committee has asked for a report on the Healthcare industry in Norway, a so called White Paper. The objective is to examine the challenges we face because of climate change, new technology, robotics and digitalization.

Innovation needs to meet industrial targets
Additionally, the committee has stressed the importance of a purposeful dedication to health innovation. There should be a focused investment In fields where we have special preconditions to succeed. A better facilitation of clinical studies and use of health data is especially emphasized. Nordic countries are in a unique position with vast registries of well documented health data, a good example being the Cancer Registry of Norway. With better implementing of new technology this type of health data will be increasingly important.

The committee also emphasized the need to shorten the distance between research and patient treatment through effective commercialization. And, in continuation, easier access to risk investment capital to help the industry grow.

–The path from research to actual treatments and medication is long and hard, and rightfully so – everything must be thoroughly tested. But you can imagine! Every second we can peel off the time it takes for new research to reach patients is extremely valuable and saves lives, explains Bjørn Klem, Managing Director, Oslo Cancer Cluster Incubator.

NOME a piece of the puzzle
However, how do we fulfill these ambitions? Klem believes the answer is combining forces within the other Nordic countries.

– We have different strengths. Think about how big Bioindustry and business is in Denmark. There is so much to learn form that!

NOME is a concrete way of collaborating. It is easy to say: “we are going to learn from each other”, but how do we in a concrete fashion set about doing this. NOME is a mentoring program that sets collaboration in motion.

— To put it plainly, NOME is a program for all Nordic Bio start-ups. They can apply and if their application is successful we send experts catered to help with the company’s very specific needs, explains Klem.

NOME is a meeting place between the start-up freshman and the experts that have thread this path before. They match Nordic entrepreneurs with handpicked international professionals to help each start-up with their specific needs.

— Think about it! There is so much a new start-up don’t know, lacking network and experience. How do you make it as a commercialized company in the health industry? NOME can provide both business and research mentoring transferring knowledge from past successes to new ones, says Klem.

A Twofold Benefit to Society
The desire is to propel the Nordic countries into one of the leading life science regions to commercialize high growth life science start-ups.

— With NOME society’s return is twofold. Firstly, we give patients access to new treatment faster by giving start-ups the necessary guidance and know-how. Secondly, we give our Bio Business a chance to grow with all the positives that has to economy and employment, Klem believes.

Oslo Cancer Cluster Incubator coordinates the NOME-program in Norway and collaborates with the incubator Aleap to find the best match of mentors and entrepreneurs. To take part in the program you can click here for more information.

Missed Us at Oslo Innovation Week?

Luckily, all our events at Oslo Innovation Week and Forskningsdagene are available for a rerun. Have a look!

We had great audiences during our three events on the 27th and 28th of September. If your were not among them, sitting in the brand new science centre of the Norwegian Cancer Society, do not despair. The events were all live streamed on Facebook. You still have a chance to experience them right here.

The events were co-hosted with our partners the Norwegian Cancer Society, the Norwegian Radium Hospital Research Foundation (Radforsk), IBM, Cancer Research UK, Norway Health Tech and EAT.

 

The first event of the week was titled “Antibiotic resistance and cancer – current status, and how to prevent a potential apocalyptic scenario”.

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Antibiotic resistance and cancer – Current status, and how to prevent a potential apocalyptic scenario #OIW2017

Posted by Kreftforeningen on Tuesday, September 26, 2017

 

Our secondary event had the title “Cancer research and innovation – benefit for patients”.

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Cancer research and innovation – benefit for patients #OIW2017

Posted by Kreftforeningen on Wednesday, September 27, 2017

 

The third and final event on our Oslo Innovation Week calendar was about how big data may transform the development of cancer treatments. 

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How Big Data may transform the development of cancer treatments #OIW2017

Posted by Kreftforeningen on Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Thermo Fisher Scientific Wins Innovation Award

The Research Council of Norway has given Thermo Fisher Scientific the prestigious Innovation Award for their Dynabeads.

 

The Oslo Cancer Cluster member Thermo Fischer Scientific was awarded the prize for developing an entirely new variant of an existing product, making it possible to analyse human genes quickly and effectively and improve diagnostic testing and patient treatment.

This is the technology known as «Dynabeads» that makes faster and cheaper DNA-sequencing accesible.

– The award means a lot to us as a company, and to everybody who has been working on product, production and launch during these years. It is an acknowledgement that investment, cooperation and important global products are noticed, says Ole Dahlberg, CEO at Thermo Fischer Scientific Norway.

Vital role in Norwegian biotech
Thermo Fisher Scientific is one of Norway´s leading biotechs and among the most profitable. The company has played a vital role in Norwegian biotech with the development of «Dynabeads», used all over the world to separate, isolate and manipulate biological materials.

Thermo Fisher’s Dynabeads are used in basic research, in billions of diagnostic tests, as well as in immunotherapy.

In May this year, Thermo Fisher Scientific was nominated for the “Norway’s smartest industrial company” award for the same technology. The smart element was using the beads in a completely new way on a microchip in combination with semiconductor technology. This link between biotech and electronics has created the instruments from Thermo Fisher which we now see in research institutes and diagnostic labs all over the world.

Ambitious research and development
– Thermo Fisher Scientific is carrying out an ambitious research and development effort in a very important area. The company is achieving this by using its own resources, seeking cooperation with exacting customers and drawing on public funding schemes from, among others, the Research Council of Norway. In this way, the company contributes to job creation as well as value creation, said Monica Mæland, Minister of Trade and Industry, according to The Research Council of Norway. She presented the Innovation Award during the Arendal Week in August.

The Research Council’s Innovation Award comprises a cash prize of NOK 500 000 and is given each year to a business or public entity that has demonstrated an outstanding ability to apply research results to create research-based innovation.